Delivery + charity: water’s Instagram Account

Abstract

As delivery as an act of rhetoric changes, it incorporates current forms of communication, such a social media. For nonprofits like charity: water, Instagram is an interface of delivery with affordances for storytelling and fundraising through specific design choices. These design choices reflect delivery strategies through the remediation of literacy in technology, allowing charity: water to develop a brand and engage an audience.

Presentation

Video presentation about charity: water’s use of delivery to develop a brand

Works Cited

arkeopoliss. “”Demosthenes’in, nutuklarında vatandaşlara . . .” Instagram, 20 Apr. 2019, http://www.instagram.com/p/BwetzvXBZ1O/.

charity: water. charitywater. 21 June 2019, http://www.instagram.com/charitywater/.

— “Access to clean water is giving . . .” Instagram, 20 June 2019, http://www.instagram.com/p/By6I5iqAROa/.

— “As we close the books on 2018. . .” Instagram, 25 Jan. 2019, https://www.instagram.com/p/BtEzC5JhkYn/.

— “Harry and two of his friends . . .” Instagram, 15 June 2019, http://www.instagram.com/p/ByquJYfpRIn/.

“Moms around the world. . .” Instagram, 24 Apr. 2019, http://www.instagram.com/p/BwqEu6_gTvi/.

“Spring members! Keep an eye on your inbox. . .” Instagram, 1 Feb. 2019, http://www.instagram.com/p/BtW-9YXBiIN/.

“We’re thrilled to announce that #charitywater supporters in the UK. . .” Instagram, 12 June 2019, http://www.instagram.com/p/Byn1YRfgPO1/

— “Your 2018 Impact (Part 6): Your #ThirstBook purchases . . .” Instagram, 30 Jan. 2019, http://www.instagram.com/p/BtR0yrzhKQH/?utm_source=ig_web_copy_link.

Elizabeth Riley. elizabeth._riley. 21 June 2019, http://www.instagram.com.

Grounds, John. “Editorial: Special Issue on Charity Branding.” International Journal of Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Marketing, vol 10, no. 2, May 2005, pp. 65-67. Wiley Interscience, doi: 10.1002/nvsm.19.

Harrison, Scott and Lisa Sweetingham. Thirst: A Story of Redemption, Compassion, and a Mission to Bring Clean Water to the World. Currency, 2018.

McCorkle, Ben. Rhetorical Delivery as Technological Discourse: A Cross-Historical Study. Southern Illinois University Press, 2012.

Palmeri, Jason. “Composition Has Always Already Been Multimodal.” Remixing Composition: A History of Multimodal Writing Pedagogy. Southern Illinois University Press, 2012, pp. 21-50. 

Yan, Jack. “Social Media in Branding: Fulfilling a Need.” Journal of Brand Management, vol. 18, no. 9, 2011, pp. 688-696. ProQuest, doi: 10.1057/bm.2011.19.

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Aloha to the Hawaiian Language

The New London Group’s “A Pedagogy of Multiliteracies: Designing Social Futures” discusses the role of cultures and experiences in literacy and society.

“In this article, we attempt to broaden this understanding of literacy and literacy teaching to include negotiating a multiplicity of discourses” (New London Group 61).

The article continues by posing questions to readers:

“How do we ensure that differences of culture, language, and gender are not barriers to educational success? . . . What is appropriate education for women, for indigenous peoples, for immigrants who do not speak the national language, for speakers of non-standard dialects? What is appropriate for all in the context of ever more critical factors of local diversity and global connectedness?” (New London Group 61).

In response to questions like these, there are podcasts like Code Switch from NPR. The very title of one episode hints at the desire to consider different cultures, experiences, and discourses: “E Ola Ka ‘Olelo Hawai’i.”

A screenshot I took of the Code Switch episode “E Ola Ka ‘Olelo Hawai’i” on the Apple Podcast app

This podcast tells the story of Hawaiians fighting for the survival of their native language, particularly through starting a school where instruction is entirely in Hawaiian.

MERAJI: Despite all this, Keiki and her husband made the decision to raise their kids in a Hawaiian-only home in the 1980s.

KAWAI’AE’A: There were only about half a dozen of us who were doing that. So it was kind of an isolated feeling. And then as the Punana Leo preschool started to open and we started to gather around this common idea of our children being Hawaiian speakers, so launched our movement.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

MERAJI: When the toddlers in the Punana Leo were ready for kindergarten, they created a kindergarten. And when it was time for first grade, they made a first grade. And so on until they reached 12th grade. Keiki’s daughter graduated with the first class of this experimental new school, called Ke Kula ‘O Nawahiokalani’opu’u, Nawahi for short. That was 20 years ago. Nawahi’s class of 1999 had five graduates. And its mission was then and still is bring Hawaiian back. (“E Ola Ka ‘Olelo Hawai’i” 13:56-14:52)

As the New London Group recognizes, there needs to be an intentional recognition of the lives students bring to the classroom. As this Code Switch episode shared, that recognition might be fighting the extinction of a language by doing something no one else is– living and teaching in Hawaiian (1:44-2:07).

The New London puts languages and literacies into three categories: working life, public life, and private life (65). The unique thing about Ke Kula ‘O Nawahiokalani’opu’u, the all-Hawaiian school, is that it encourages bringing all of those areas together. It offers evening classes for parents to learn Hawaiian so that students can speak Hawaiian at school and in their homes, currently what would be students’ working and private lives (22:02-22:16).

What isn’t available to Hawaiian speakers yet is the public life of their language. Outside of their homes and schools, these parents and children, teachers and students aren’t able to speak their native language.

MERAJI: Professor Kimura says you still can’t do basic things yet, like walk into any bank or post office or grocery store, and speak Hawaiian, let alone government offices or the courts. It’s one of Hawaii’s official languages, after all. So he says the next step is for these young people who graduate from Nawahi to push for Hawaiian to be spoken all over Hawaii so speaking the language isn’t unique; it’s normal” (“E Ola Ka ‘Olelo Hawai’i” 31:38-32:10).

The New London Group explains the complexity of each of these areas of life, that they blend, ebb, adapt, and conflict.

“As people are simultaneously members of multiple lifeworlds, so their identities have multiple layers that are in complex relation to each other. No person is a member of a singular community. Rather, they are members of multiple and overlapping communities– communities of work, of interest and affiliation, of ethnicity, of sexual identity, and so on” (71).

While the Hawaiian school is embracing a neglected element of culture, is it doing so at the expense of any other parts of culture and experience for these students? Or, is it allowing for multiliteracies that would make the New London Group excited?

“Classroom teaching and curriculum have to engage with students’ own experiences and discourses, which are increasingly defined by cultural and subcultural diversity and the different language backgrounds and practices that come with this diversity” (New London Group 88).

And perhaps that is exactly what Ke Kula ‘O Nawahiokalani’opu’u is doing.

Works Cited

“E Ola Ka ‘Olelo Hawai’i.” Code Switch from NPR, 12 June 2019, http://www.npr.org/templates/transcript/transcript.php?storyId=731868951.

New London Group. “A Pedagogy of Multiliteracies: Designing Social Futures.” Harvard Educational Review. vol 66, no. 1, 1996, pp. 60-92. 

Delivery and Branding

I picked up the book Thirst from the library after seeing it advertised on charity: water’s social media account (charity: water). The quick interaction of me seeing the advertisement, going to the library, and starting to read got me thinking about how charities use social media to support their causes and how they create a brand for themselves. It’s delivery. It’s part of what Ben McCorkle is considering in his book Rhetorical Delivery as Technological Discourse: A Cross-Historical Study.

“In our present moment, a number of rhetorical theorists are extending our body-centric notion of delivery so that it no longer deals exclusively with the vocal or gestural aspects of an oration but also with the medium, design elements, or paratextual features of non-oratorical artifacts” (McCorkle 2).

As McCorkle considers delivery, he looks at its historical developments and its current role in society as something that goes well beyond someone standing on a stage and speaking. How social media is used, especially for an organization promoting itself, is intentional in its design to accomplish a purpose.

“The redefinition of delivery, therefore, can be viewed as both a diagnostic and a therapeutic instrument in the development and cultural permeation of emergent digital technologies of communication. . . . they are are part of a multifaceted network of interrelated forces” (McCorkle 140).

McCorkle argues that delivery fills a similar role that it always has but in new ways. The sources below consider both delivery and the specifics of delivery and branding for charities and nonprofits, which is what I plan on building my final presentation around.

“The rules pertaining to the manipulation of the material elements of nonverbal texts, for centuries hidden throughout the remaining canons and masquerading as issues of style, invention, arrangement, or otherwise, are repositioned under the aegis of delivery at a time when the composer’s ability to personally manipulate that text is easier than it is under the rigid fixity of print” (McCorkle 160).

How do organizations like charity: water use delivery to brand themselves in the form of social media?

“We are beginning to understand that, to varying degrees, technologies of writing and communication have always had the capacity within them to communicate via their form” (McCorkle 161).

Consider the final presentation question adapted for this idea: How does the relationship between delivery and social media technology — to promote the specific brands and ideas in the current social, cultural, political environment– reveal itself as charities use social media platforms to promote their causes?

Works Cited

charity: water. charitywater. “Your 2018 Impact (Part 6): Your #ThirstBook purchases . . .” Instagram, 30 Jan. 2019, http://www.instagram.com/p/BtR0yrzhKQH/?utm_source=ig_web_copy_link.

Grounds, John. “Editorial: Special Issue on Charity Branding.” International Journal of Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Marketing, vol 10, no. 2, May 2005, pp. 65-67. Wiley Interscience, doi: 10.1002/nvsm.19.

Harrison, Scott and Lisa Sweetingham. Thirst: A Story of Redemption, Compassion, and a Mission to Bring Clean Water to the World. Currency, 2018.

Kissel, Patrick, and Marion Büttgen. “Using Social Media to Communicate Employer Brand Identity: The Impact on Corporate Image and Employer Attractiveness.” Journal of Brand Management, vol. 22, no. 9, 2015, pp. 755-777. ProQuest, doi: 10.1057/bm.2015.42.

McCorkle, Ben. Rhetorical Delivery as Technological Discourse: A Cross-Historical Study. Southern Illinois University Press, 2012.

Welch, Kathleen. Electric Rhetoric: Classical Rhetoric, Oralism, and a New Literacy. MIT Press, 1999. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=nlebk&AN=9352&site=ehost-live.

Wymer, Walter, et al. “Effects of Corporate Support of a Charity on Public Perceptions of the Charity.” Voluntas: International Society for Third-Sector Research, vol. 25, no. 6, Dec. 2014, pp. 1388–1416. SpringerLink, doi-org.ezproxy.gardner-webb.edu/10.1007/s11266-013-9397-y.

Yan, Jack. “Social Media in Branding: Fulfilling a Need.” Journal of Brand Management, vol. 18, no. 9, 2011, pp. 688-696. ProQuest, doi: 10.1057/bm.2011.19.

When the Word is Right (or Write?)

Draft 3

Let me begin by saying that the act of typing this blog post is somewhat counter to the very thing this post is about. Here’s what I want to consider: writing as technology is changed in part by our ability to edit our writing because — for good or otherwise — we can’t see our work being changed.

In her essay “Shitty First Drafts,” Anne Lamott says the first drafts are important:

“You need to start somewhere. Start by getting something — anything — down on paper” (2).

Dennis Baron, in “From Pixels to Pencils: The Stages of Literacy Technologies,” says of the pencil with an eraser, “American schools allowed no crossing out. Teachers preferred pencils without erasers, arguing that students would do better, more premeditated work if they didn’t have the option of revising. The students won this one, too: eraserless pencils are now extremely rare. Artists use them, because artists need special erasers in the work; golfers too use pencils without erasers, perhaps to keep themselves honest. As for the no-crossing-out rule, writing teachers now routinely warn students that writers never get it right the first time, and we expect them to revise their work endlessly until it is polished to perfection” (82).

Do we edit more or less on a computer than by hand? Is the eraser to the pencil what backspace is to the computer? Or, is backspace the intensified eraser because it completely removes? We rewrite a nicer draft by hand; we edit away the bad draft on a computer.

Baron continues,

“We have a way of getting so used to writing technologies that we come to think of them as natural rather than technological” (83).

What’s natural for the technology of writing?

  • The pencil?
  • The typewriter one of my students brought to class last week?
  • The keyboard I’m typing on now?
  • The act of writing, whatever form it takes place in?

Lamott considers, “The first draft is the child’s draft, where you let it all pour out and then let it romp all over the place, knowing that no one is going to see it and that you can shape it later” (1). Is it the first draft, in all its “shitty-ness,” the one that is the truest?

I don’t have definite answers to this question, but my gut response tends toward Lamott. The natural messiness of a first draft seems right, and when I type, I don’t see that transformation. Personally, I like seeing where I start and where I end and that I made it somewhere in the process. If it is a typed first draft, I usually edit by hand so that I can be engaged in the changes that need to be made.

We don’t get to see that change if we don’t have that first draft. Lamott poses,

“Very few writers really know what they are doing until they’ve done it” (1).

Lamott ends her essay, “A friend of mine says that the first draft is the down draft — you must get it down. The second draft is the up draft — you fix it up. You try to say what you have to say more accurately. And the third draft is the dental draft, where you check every tooth, to see if it’s loose or cramped or decayed, or even, God help us, healthy” (2). (Bold font is mine.)

To continue in her metaphor, can we achieve healthy teeth without the brushing and the flossing? Do we need that pencil to best complete the cleaning?

Draft 2

I’d realize that the ideal would likely be that there is time between drafts. But I have one more hour at Starbucks before I need to be back at school for high school graduation tonight, so here goes draft two of three in one sitting:

Let me begin by saying that the act of typing this blog post is somewhat counter to the very thing this post is about. Here’s what I want to consider: writing as technology is changed in part by our ability to edit our writing because — for good or otherwise — we can’t see our work being changed.

In her essay “Shitty First Drafts,” Anne Lamott says the first drafts are important: “You need to start somewhere. Start by getting something — anything — down on paper” (2).

Dennis Baron, in “From Pixels to Pencils: The Stages of Literacy Technologies,” says of the pencil with an eraser, “American schools allowed no crossing out. Teachers preferred pencils without erasers, arguing that students would do better, more premeditated work if they didn’t have the option of revising. The students won this one, too: eraserless pencils are now extremely rare. Artists use them, because artists need special erasers in the work; golfers too use pencils without erasers, perhaps to keep themselves honest. As for the no-crossing-out rule, writing teachers now routinely warn students that writers never get it right the first time, we expect them to revise their work endlessly until it is polished to perfection” (82).

Do we edit more or less on a computer than by hand? Is the eraser to the pencil what backspace is to the computer? Or, is backspace the intensified eraser because it completely removes? We rewrite a nicer draft by hand; we edit away the bad draft on a computer.

Baron continues, “We have a way of getting so used to writing technologies that we come to think of them as natural rather than technological” (83). What’s natural for writing? The pencil? The typewriter one of my students brought to class last week? The keyboard I’m typing on now? Writing, whatever form it takes place in?

Lamott considers, “The first draft is the child’s draft, where you let it all pour out and then let it romp all over the place, knowing that no one is going to see it and that you can shape it later” (1). Is it the first draft, in all its “shitty-ness” the one that is the truest?

I don’t have definite answers to this question, but my gut response tends toward Lamott. The natural, messiness of a first draft seems right, and when I type, I don’t see that transformation. Personally, I like seeing where I start and where I end and that I made it somewhere in the process. If it is a typed first draft, I edit by hand so that I can be engaged in the changes that need to be made.

Lamott poses, “Very few writers really know what they are doing until they’ve done it” (1). We don’t get to see that change if we don’t have that first draft.

Lamott ends her essay, “A friend of mine says that the first draft is the down draft — you must get it down. The second draft is the up draft — you fix it up. You try to say what you have to say more accurately. And the third draft is the dental draft, where you check every tooth, to see if it’s loose or cramped or decayed, or even, God help us, healthy” (2).

To follow in her metaphor, can we get to healthy teeth without the brushing and the flossing? Do we need that pencil to best complete the cleaning?

Draft 1

Let me begin by saying that the act of typing this blog post is somewhat counter to the very thing this post is about. Also, you’ll never know what the first draft of this blog post is. (Except, I just had a great idea: I’m going to in fact share my “shitty first draft.” Hooray for copy and paste.)

Okay, so knowing I”m going for a demonstration of The Shitty First Draft, Here’s what I’m going for (I almost just backspaced to fix me “H” capitalization, but I stopped myself. In typing that explanation, I’ve backspaced multiple times. It seems inevitable).

Here’s what I want to consider: writing as technology has changed in part by our ability to edit our writing, but for good (how nice is it that I can copy and past this text for editing purposes) and for bad– usually we don’t draft as much and we can’t SEE our work being changed.

Lamott says the first drafts are important, “You need to start somewhere. Start by getting something — anything — down on paper” (2). Baron says of the pencil with an eraser, “But American schools allowed no crossing out. Teachers preferred pencils without erasers, arguing that students would do better, more premeditated work if they didn’t have the poption of revising. THe students won this one, too: eraserless pencils are now extremely rare. Artists use them, because artists need special erasers in the work; golfers too use pencils without erasers, perhpaos to keep themselves honest. As for the no-crossing-out rule, writing teachers now routinely wran students that writers never et it right the firs ttime, we expect htem to revise their workd endlessly until it is polished to perfection” (82). Yes, I realize there are typos in this direct quote. It’s my first draft; I’ll fix it later.

Here’s what I’m thinking: Do we edit more or less on a computer than by hand? Is the eraser to the pencil what backspace is to the computer? Or, is backspace the intensified eraser because it completely removes? We rewrite a nicer draft by hand; we edit away the bad draft on a computer. (Except, of course, for this bad draft.)

Baron continues, “We have a way of getting so used to writing technologies that we come to think of theme as natural rather than technological” (83). What’s natural for writing? The pencil? The typewriter a student brought to class last week? The keyboard I’m typing on now? Writing, whatever form it takes place in?

Lamott considers, “The first draft is the child’s draft, where you let it all pour out and then let it romp all over the place, knowing that no one is going to see it and that you can shape it later” (1). Whoops. People will see this first draft. But, back to my point, is a first draft like this one natural and right?

I don’t have definite answers to this question, but my gut response tends toward Lamott. The natural, messiness of a first draft seems right, and when I type, I don’t see that transformation. Personally, I like seeing where I start and where I end and that I made it somewhere in the process. Lamott writes, “Very few writers really know what they are doing until they’ve done it” (1). We don’t get to see that change if we don’t have that first draft. Of drafts, Lamott ends her essay, “A friend of mine says that the first draft is the down draft — you mnust get it down. THe second draft is the up draft — you fix it up. You try to say what you have to say more accurately. And the third draft is the dental draft, wher eoyu check every tooth, to see if it’s loose or cramped or decayed, or even , God help us, healthy” (2).

To follow in her metaphor, can we get to healthy teeth without the brushing and the flossing? That, at least for this first draft, is where I’ll leave you.

Works Cited

Baron, Dennis “From Pencils to Pixels: The Stages of Literacy Technology.” Passions, Pedagogies, and 21st Century Technologies. Ed. Gail Hawisher & Cynthia Selfe. Utah State UP, YR, pp. 15-33. 

Lamott, Anne. “Shitty First Drafts.” Language Awareness: Readings for College Writers, ed. by Paul Escholz, Alfred Rosa, and Virginia Clark, 9th ed., Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2005, pp. 93-96. Writing, Rhetoric, and Digital Studies, University of Kentucky, pp. 1-2, wrd.as.uky.edu/sites/default/files/1-Shitty%20First%20Drafts.pdf.

The Old is New

“We’re taking words and translating them into images” (“The Saint John’s Bible” 2:13-2:17)

Father Michael Patella

My dad attended St. John’s University in Minnesota for his undergrad, and while in some ways it’s just another private university, something that always made it unique when we’d stop by on childhood summer trips to Minnesota was the monastery in the middle of campus. As my dad would start reminiscing, he’d remember monks by name and check with the information desk to see if any of them– his former professors–were on campus.

While going to Minnesota to see relatives and stop by St. John’s happened fairly often, we also received regular mail from the University, and from that mail and from relatives who bought coffee-table books or framed portions, I watched The Saint John’s Bible go from a concept to a realization. The Saint John’s Bible is a completely hand-written and illustrated production of the Bible completed over years of time with the collaboration of both monks and artists.

This week as we’ve read about handwriting, images, memory, and knowledge, among other things, this Bible is the familiar reference my mind keeps turning to.

In Mary Carruther’s chapter “Memory and the Book” from The Book of Memory, she writes about early manuscripts that followed principles that are evident in the work of The Saint John’s Bible. Carruthers writes, “It is not, in our sense, a picture of some thing but rather the means for memorizing and recollecting the same matter or story that written letters also record” (222). She continues shortly after, “Both textual activities, picturing and reading, have as their goal not simply the learning of a story, but learning it to familiarize and domesticate it, in that fully internalized, even physiological way that medieval reading required” (222).

Pictures used in this sense are used to reinforce and memorialize the text that the images support. Referring to a quote by Giraldus Cambrensis, Carruther explains, “figures grouped in the picture are designed both to recall and to stimulate further mental image-making in the reader” (255).

Carruther gives these near-final thoughts in her chapter: “the page is designed to make one meditate upon it, to look and look again, and remake its patterns oneself; the process of seeing this page models the process of meditative reading which the text it introduces will require” (257). The text and the images are interconnected in both purpose and meaning, and the combination of the two strengthens the message of the text.

Here, the lead calligrapher talks about his role in creating the text. Note the use of technology to help him in this “by-hand” production (“Donald Jackson”).

Donald Jackson explains that even in his design of the font for The St. John’s Bible, he considered how to capture the content with how the calligraphy was designed: “its like an orchestral composition. There are going to be places where they are going to be trumpets blowing . . . . There are going to be places where you have serenity” (3:20-3:33).

This video explores the importance of images in understanding the piece and its text from the perspective of one of the monks that led the project (“The Saint John’s Bible”).

Father Michael Patella describes The Saint John’s Bible as a process of “illuminating the Bible” (0:35-0:40). He says, “I realized that art and theology cannot be separated. . . . We’re taking words and translating them into images” (2:06-2:17). He explains, “I myself use it in my classroom . . . and right away I notice that when they can look at an image instead of reading a text, all the barriers go down” (3:37-3:48).

Jackson and Patella both realize the application of Carruther’s work, that text is experienced with images in a way that is remembered, and with that memory, there is lasting impact.

While my dad didn’t choose to attend St. John’s University for it’s future influence on my master’s education, it’s exciting to see how my learning now connects to so much of my life experience and deepens those experiences by giving them contexts they didn’t have before.

Works Cited

Carruthers, Mary. “Memory and the Book.” The Book of Memory. Cambridge U.P, 1990, pp. 221-220. 

“‘Donald Jackson: The Calligrapher’ — The Saint John’s Bible.” Youtube, Canton Museum of Art, 20 Feb. 2013, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pTS5m59DPoo.

“The Saint John’s Bible – Father Michael Patella.” Youtube, The St. John’s Bible, 24 Aug. 2016, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B24AM6sPYK8.

A Literacy of People

My digital literacy narrative that might broaden how you think of literacy.

Literate: “having knowledge or competence”

Merriam-Webster Dictionary

In my video, I talk about two ways to be “literate” in people: listening and asking questions. Right there, I have already made the assumption that the person viewing my video can easily accomplish both of these tasks.

If someone asked me a week ago how well I attended to accessibility with students or with people generally, I likely would have rated myself fairly high. I would have done the same related to my knowledge of accessibilities and abilities. After all, I took one class in college on the topic.

However, I’ve learned there were areas I am missing and intentionality I am lacking. While there are some things I will change in my teaching and certainly things I will be aware of if I ever teach at a school that accepts students with a broader rage of abilities, the connection I made to accessibility isn’t so much with those I currently teach as with those I hope to teach in the future, whose own literacy narrative I want to be a part of.

Underground Writing is a nonprofit in the community I live in. I’ve known of the program for about a year and have listened to the bi-weekly podcast for that time. I eagerly anticipated the publication of a book of poetry from this organization a few months ago, and read it, finding that it is one of those collections of experiences and ideas that settles in the back of my mind. According to the their website, Underground Writing is “a literature-based creative writing program serving migrant, incarcerated, recovery, and other at-risk communities in Northern Washington through literary engagement and personal restoration.”

This program is in many ways about accessibility. No, not accessibility related to technology but certainly related to communication, to people, to listening and asking questions. Underground Writing provides what vulnerable groups of people don’t often receive: education, creativity, instruction, outlet, care. They take something that I teach as an elective that any student can take at my school, and instead, they offer it to writers whom otherwise might be sitting in their cells.

Today, I had the opportunity to have coffee with the executive director of this program, Matt Malyon. He shared about his perspective on teaching these populations and providing a type of accessibility for them as students who often are missing anything like creative writing in their lives. The website additionally shares, “Honoring the transforming power of the word, we believe that attentive reading leads to attentive writing, and that attentive writing has the power to assist in the restoration of communities, the imagination, and individual lives.”

I don’t know exactly where this increasing interest and literacy will lead me besides the library to check out some of the books Malyon recommended, but as I anticipate moving over the summer and being in a new community, I’m eager to see how I can be part of a sort of accessibility in this growing area of people-literacy in my life.

Works Cited

Malyon, Matt. Personal Interview. Underground Writing,3 Apr. 2019.

“Literate.” Merriam-Webster Dictionary, 2019,
http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/literate#h1.

“Our Story.” Underground Writing. 2019, undergroundwriting.org/our-story.